Lead-Based Paint

For Your Clients: Use Lead-Safe Professional for Older Homes

Lead Paint Tips

RISMEDIA, November 27, 2010–When you are ready to remodel or renovate your pre-1978 home, it’s important to hire a Lead-Safe-Certified professional, recommends the National Association of Home Builders.

Before being banned in 1978, lead was a common ingredient in exterior and interior house paint, and is still present in many older homes. Lead ingestion has been shown to cause developmental delays and disabilities in young children.

In April 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency enacted the Lead: Renovation, Repair, and Painting rule that requires training in lead-safe work practices for all remodelers working in pre-1978 homes. EPA Lead-Safe Certified Renovators are equipped to use lead test kits, educate consumers about the dangers of lead and use prescribed lead-safe work practices.

“Lead-Safe Certified Renovators are trained to help keep your family safe from lead exposure during your remodeling project,” said NAHB Remodelers Chairman Donna Shirey, CGR, CAPS, CGP, and remodeler from Issaquah, Wash.

“It always pays to get the job done right,” said Shirey. “Remodeling professionals have expertise in design solutions, managing product choices and completing beautiful projects. Plus lead-safe certification means the remodeler will understand and apply practices to minimize dust and lead exposure and protect the safety of your family.”

When planning your home remodel, read the EPA’s Renovate Right pamphlet to better understand the dangers of lead exposure and how to conduct a safe home remodel. Consider hiring a certified risk assessor or lead inspector to determine if your home contains lead paint. After completing the renovation, be sure to maintain records of the work that’s been done.

For sound advice on lead safety, visit www.nahb.org/leadsafe. To find an EPA Lead-Safe Certified Renovator near you, contact your local home builders’ association or use the search tool at http://www.leadfreekids.org/. For more information about home remodeling, visit www.nahb.org/remodel.